OSU-USDA Berries

Description:

'Onyx'—Trailing Blackberry

Oregon State University is seeking to commercialize Onyx, a new blackberry hybrid plant. Jointly developed by the OSU Horticulture department and USDA Agricultural Research Service, Onyx yields firm, sweet, and high quality fruit that is suitable for local and wholesale fresh market. Yields and berry quality have been evaluated extensively in observation plots and commercial orchards. In these trials, berry yield and berry weight of Onyx were better than or comparable to the yield and weight of two other commercially available blackberry plants. When compared to the commercial blackberries, Onyx has better color, higher firmness, and can better withstand damage from cold. In a small scale trial, Onyx berries showed little or no damage during shipping and handling.

  Application

  • High yield, excellent fruit quality, and healthy plants
  • High quality fresh fruit for late season
  • Berry flavor is sweet and fruity, and has less acidity

*A U.S. Patent application has been filed and is currently Patent Pending.

  Product Features and Benefits

  • Readily processed into frozen fruit, puree, juice or dried
  • Optimal firmness and skin toughness makes it suitable for handling and shipping
  • Displays minimum damage due to cold weather

'Vintage'—Red Raspberry

Oregon State University is seeking to commercialize Vintage, a new raspberry cultivar. Jointly developed by the OSU Horticulture department and USDA Agricultural Research Service, Vintage yields bright red colored, sweet, flavorful fruit that is suitable for local and wholesale fresh market. Yields and fruit quality have been evaluated extensively in observation plots and commercial orchards. Fruit characteristics such as color, flavor, texture and firmness of Vintage were evaluated against a commercially comparable variety, Heritage. Vintage berries were found to have better characteristics, specifically in color and flavor tests. Vintage berry yield was found to be comparable or better than Heritage yields.

  Application

  • Attractive, uniform sized, rounded berries
  • High quality fresh fruit for late season
  • Berry size is 30-35% larger than Heritage berry

*A U.S. Patent application has been filed and is currently Patent Pending.

  Product Features and Benefits

  • Glossy, bright red berries with excellent flavor—suitable for several fresh fruit applications
  • Better retains its shape after freezing and thawing
  • Mother plant tested negative for a range of plant viruses


‘Charm’ Strawberry

Oregon State University is looking to commercialize CHARM, a high-yielding, medium-large sized, easily-capped, cultivar with excellent processed fruit quality that is particularly suited to ice cream formulations. CHARM is a result of a collaborative effort between Oregon State University Agriculture researchers and Washington State University Agriculture researchers. CHARM has held up well with excellent yields in the second harvest season and therefore was assumed to be relatively tolerant to viruses. The most outstanding characteristics of CHARM are its high yield of easily harvested fruit with excellent flavor that were well adapted to diverse and trying locations. The fruit also has a full, balanced sweet-to-acid strawberry flavor.

  Application

  • Fresh Fruit Market
  • Processed fruit market particularly for ice cream formulations    

     

    *A U.S. Patent application has been filed and is
    currently Patent Pending. 

  Product Features and Benefits

  • High yielding
  • Particularly well suited for ice cream formulations                        
  • Tolerant to viruses
  • Excellent Flavor

‘Columbia Star’ - Thornless Blackberry

Oregon State University is seeking to commercialize the Columbia Star Blackberry. In a collaboration between the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station and the Washington Agricultural Research, they have created a thornless, machine harvestable, high quality blackberry for the processed fruit market. The plant has been harvested using an over-the-row machine in trials in Oregon and Washington and has performed extremely well. Columbia Star is the first commercial blackberry-type cultivar to be released using the ‘Lincoln Logan’ source of thornlessness. Columbia Star’s average yield was 16,750 kg/hectare with a conical shape and uniformly sized, shaped and arranged drupelets. The flavor was sweet with a nice acidic balance with aroma typical of western blackberries and with noticeable raspberry aromatic notes.

  Application

  • Fresh Fruit Market
  • Processed Fruit Market

     

    *A U.S. Patent application has been filed and is  currently Patent Pending. 

      Product Features and Benefits

    • Thornless
    • Ripe fruit separated easily from plant
    • Machine harvestable with high yields
    • Uniformly sized, conical shaped drupelets
    • Flavor is sweet with acidic balance and  blackberry/raspberry aromatic notes 

    ‘Sweet Sunrise’ Strawberry

    Oregon State University is looking to commercialize their Sweet Sunrise Strawberry. Sweet Sunrise is a joint effort between Oregon State researchers and Washington State researchers. The most outstanding characteristics of Sweet Sunrise is its exceptional fruit quality as a fresh or processed product, its medium-large fruit size and its ripening in the early mid-season and these make it well suited for the fresh or processed fruit markets. Sweet Sunrise is a high yielding cultivar that has been successfully tested in multiple trials in Oregon as well as Washington and British Columbia. The strawberry has scored well in subjective evaluations of fresh fruit characteristics and as a processed fruit. Sweet Sunrise has a full, and balanced sweet-to-acid strawberry flavor with a deep red internal color.

      Application

    • Fresh Fruit Market
    • Processed Fruit Market

      *A U.S. Patent application has been filed and is  currently                
      Patent Pending. 

        Product Features and Benefits

      • High yielding cultivar
      • High quality processed fruit
      • Full, balanced sweet-to-acid strawberry flavor                           
      • Ripening in the early mid-season

      Inventor Profile

      Dr. Chad Finn is currently a small fruit breeder with the U.S. Department of Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) in Cor-vallis, OR. He earned his BS (1983) in Horticultural Production from Purdue University. During the summers worked at the USDA-ARS Small Fruit Lab in Beltsville, Maryland in the berry breeding program. He then earned his MS (1985) and PhD (1989) in Horticulture/Plant Breeding at the University of Minnesota studying blueberry breeding. After his PhD, Dr. Finn was the State Fruit Crop Specialist at the University of Missouri. Dr. Finn’s research program has two broad objectives. The first is to develop new strawberry, blackberry, blueberry and raspberry (red and black) cultivars for the commercial industry. The second objective of his program is to collect and evaluate new germplasm, and as appropriate, incorporate it into breeding material for use in his program and for others. Dr. Finn is running berry program cooperatively with horticulturist Dr. Bernadine Strik at Oregon State University.
      Patent Information:
      Category(s):
      Agricultural
      For Information, Contact:
      Berry Treat
      IP & Licensing Manager
      Oregon State University
      berry.treat@oregonstate.edu
      Inventors:
      Chad Finn
      Keywords:
      © 2014. All Rights Reserved. Powered by Inteum