Micronozzle Atomizer for Fluid Deposition

Summary

 

Technology Description

 

Researchers at Oregon State University developed micronozzle airblast atomizers constructed in a laminate microchannel architecture. The micronozzle uses air curtains to precisely confine and deliver an array of droplets to a deposition surface or fluid. Microfluidic control valves provide discrete droplet flow to increase precision of coating area and thickness. Micromixers provide immediate mixing prior to dispersion and enables the use of new rapid reacting reagents. Micronozzle laminates are scalable and can be custom manufactured into large annular or parallel arrangements to treat considerable surface areas with a single pass. Design of laminate arrays enables easy assembly, inspection, cleaning, replacement, and low manufacturing cost.

 

Features & Benefits

 

  • Increased droplet flow control
  • Advanced air curtain delivery system
  • Reduced operating pressure
  • Customizable and scalable

 

Applications

 

  • Precision spray injectors
  • Precision surface coatings
  • Adhesive and paint coatings

 

Background of Invention

 

Numerous industries utilize spray nozzles to disperse atomized fluids for paint finishes, performance coatings, adhesives, chemical reactors, and fuel-air injected engines. Conventional spray nozzles are expensive to manufacture, limited by size, nozzle density, and droplet control. Innovations in microfluidic devices are improving fluid flow, performance, operation efficiency, and manufacturing costs. Engineered micronozzles provide precise droplet control required for efficient surface coating and high performance mixing in reactors such as fuel-air injected engines. Efficient reactor mixing reduces reagent waste, sample size, and improves reaction kinetics. High density micronozzle arrays operate at low pressure differentials, eliminate the use of bulky pumps, and can be incorporated into drones, robots, and small portable devices.

 

 

 

Status

 

Patent Pending - US Patent Application No. 14/434,389 Technology is available for licensing

 

Patent Information:
Tech ID:
OSU-12-11
Contact:
David Dickson
IP & Licensing Manager
Oregon State University
541-737-3450
david.dickson@oregonstate.edu
Inventors:
Richard Todd Miller
Neill Thornton
Keywords:
Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Inst. (ATAMI)
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